Gov. Newsom speaks about California’s COVID-19 response from budget proposal

Gov. Newsom speaks about California’s COVID-19 response from budget proposal



thank you supervisor. Um I want to thank supervisor han I want to thank Mayor um for the graciousness and their words. I want to thank them more importantly for their hard work and their leadership and their stewardship during this particularly challenging fourth wave Of this pandemic. I want to first acknowledge all the hard work that you see going on behind me, most of it on the other side of the bus. This bus represents as the supervisor mentioned, one of 50 mobile sites that we’ve set up throughout the state of California. What are referred to as the optimum served sites? These optimum service sites not only serve the needs of residents in paramount in L. A. County, but residents all across the state of California, roughly 650 or so, folks were served just yesterday here at this site. It’s open between the hours of seven in the morning, seven at night, seven days a week recognizing the need to expand these hours of operation and expand access to the opportunity to get tested. We deployed recently, the National Guard, you’ll see a number of National Guards, men and women behind me as well assisting in this operation. To make things more efficient and to make sure data is collected more effectively. We have distributed across the state of California to support these 50 sites, 200 national guardsmen and women. We have 80 more Going out the rest of this week uh and 80 represents the number of optimum service sites that will also be set up as the number of total sites goes from 50 to 80 across the state. It’s important to note to the extent it matters perhaps less so to people and more dense parts of the state like L. A. County. But rural and remote parts of California are also being served. And this is an important point that needs to be emphasized 90% of the population. In the nation’s largest state, 90% of the population is within 30 miles or 30 minutes rather drive of an optimum served site. And while that’s impressive, we recognize it’s not good enough. Nor is the fact that there are lines appearing in sites like this all across the state that said, I think it’s important that you understand what this state has done in terms of testing 6000 288 sites, 60 288 sites Our existing or rather persist and are providing access to testing in the state of California. That’s roughly 31 of all of the national testing sites at least as of a week or so ago. It’s not insignificant. So it shows what’s been done, but it also shows where the gaps remain. We don’t want to see these lines. We don’t want to see folks have to line up particularly on this side of the bus and those are walk ins versus those that have appointments. And so we continue to provide more support to expand these sites, more personnel, more expertise uh and more testing locations throughout the state of California though, as supervisor noted. Perhaps none more important than our public schools. It’s interesting and we’re grateful that the president, United States, the administration today announced a gold nationwide of providing 10 million tests a month to our schools, 10 million a month for the country. And while that’s impressive, I want to impress upon you that we just provided 10.9 million tests In the last 30 days just here in California for our public schools. And while that’s impressive in many respects, it also gives you, I think a perspective of what we are up against nationwide in terms of the scarcity, particularly over the counter tests. The fact that California was able to do that is because we’re California. It’s because we spent the holidays dr Galili and his team and our office emergency service quite literally at warehouses, reports, airports, making sure that those tests actually arrived and weren’t rerouted in other parts of the country. We yes, competed against the federal government for those tests. That’s not the way things should be this far into the pandemic. I’m I’m not suggesting otherwise, but I am suggesting we are able to punch above our weight because we’re California in order to continue to punch above our weight and to address the weights and the lines at sites like this and all over the state of California. We recognize we have to do more and today we want to lay out with a little more detail, Our $2.7 billion 48 hours ago to the legislature. It includes early action sense of urgency. I want to introduce the budget months of deliberation, give and take. We don’t want to wait months. You can’t wait another minute in line folks are frustrated. So we are working not calling on because our legislative leaders have been extraordinary. But we’re working with our legislative leaders to calendar early action of $1.4 billion. That would include hundreds of millions of dollars for more staff, hundreds of millions of dollars, more tests, hundreds of millions of dollars more for more sites to do. The most important thing we continue to have work to do and that’s get boosted and to get vaccinated if indeed you have not gotten vaccinated. So we’re here to highlight that early action. 1.4 billion of a $2.7 billion dollars budgetary requests highlight the work that is being done, acknowledge the work that needs to be done and the gaps that need to be closed and reinforce the need to continue to support the federal government’s effort at scale to procure the hundreds of millions, no billions of tests that are necessary to move us out of this phase and into a new phase as we turn the page to a new phase. Let me just acknowledge the phase. We’re in briefly. This is going to be a challenging period. It is a challenging period for so many folks that we’re hoping after what we experienced the last few surges that we would not be experiencing yet another variant, particularly one. Uh that is so ubiquitous in our lives with the omicron variant. And while it’s absolutely true, I you don’t need to hear from me, you’ve heard from everybody else as it relates to the nature of this variant. We all know two things. One is that it is easily transmitted, but we also know that it is less severe than previous variants that said. The total number in the aggregate puts enormous pressure ultimately on our healthcare system and that is demonstrated and demonstrable across this country and not least of which here in California, particularly as it relates to staffing needs in our health care system. And that’s why the state of California over the course of the last many weeks, we’re not reacting to this. We in many ways we’re anticipating this. We have brought in out of state contract staff 2000 363 contract staff that we brought into the state of California over the course last many weeks, 1250 more that will be bringing in to help support our healthcare system and to support our healthcare workers. We are providing flexibility which we provided in 2020, 2021 two facilities as it relates to how they utilize that staff and we recognize how weary those staff are. You have someone remarkable young woman operating this site. She’s a NiCU basically works in the ICU for kids. That’s her real job and she’s here working to test because she’s feeling the need and she put her head down and said, I’m exhausted. And if we kept talking, I would have started to break down a little bit and her physiology said all you need to know, she didn’t even need to share. The words were just exhausted emotionally physically because we were all exhausted. Every single one of you are exhausted by this. And all I’m going to say is we’re going to get through this just a few more weeks, A few more weeks. You’re starting to see not just parts of the globe South africa UK, but even parts of this country where we’re starting to see in the last three or four days, some case leveling that’s going to happen here in the state of California as well. And while we’ve outperformed other large states, let me be specific, if you lived in florida, We would have roughly 40,000 more deaths if per capita death rate was equivalent here in California. We actually have 50% lower per capita death rate. In the state of California, 35% lower than the state of Texas. We have a 50% lower positivity rate than that state. Those states today that’s not to impress upon anything. I’m not impressed by any of that except to say we continue to lean in are not shy and we, you know, we continue to try to lead across the spectrum of supports. But yes, we have more work to do so on issues of health care system. And finally, and the issue of schools, I recognize that we have challenges that we’re facing in the next few weeks there as well. And that’s why yesterday we put out an executive order allowing more flexibility for our public educators to bring in substitutes more retirees to allow the opportunity to help address the workforce constraints as well. Because so many members of staff, our educators. Paraprofessionals, not just teachers are testing positive as well. We need to keep our kids in person instruction safely in school. That is our priority. It will continue to be. And the staffing flexibility. Eo I put out yesterday, executive order, we hope helps in that effort as well as the number. And dr galley remind me how many n 95 masks we’ve sent to our schools. Nine million. This is important. nine million not cloth masks, Not 900,000. Not a million. nine million. In the last few weeks we’ve sent out to our public schools. We have a website. Salesforce put up the office emergency services on demand. We’ve done one billion units. One billion units to cities counties, school districts and local health offices all across the state. Nine million specifically to public schools and 95 in addition to the billions and billions of dollars to support there are other efforts. So again, no one’s trying to impress anybody here. I know how hard this is and how pressed we all are with the pressure that we’re all experiencing, particularly parents out there. And uh, and I just want folks to know we’re doing what we can incredible leadership at the local level, partners at the state and federal level here to assist trying to be creative, trying to be flexible and moving as conditions change in real time to adapt to those changing conditions. So with all of that, I am here to answer any questions and if you’re wondering, um, well, I’m dressed up for this occasion. We were down in san Diego cleaning up encampments and that’s a way of saying this. We can do many things at the same time and don’t think we’re taking our eye off the ball around the most important pressing issues in the state. But right now, the most important impressing issue is getting this pandemic behind us. Once

Gov. Newsom speaks about California’s COVID-19 response from budget proposal

Gov. Gavin Newsom was in Los Angeles County on Wednesday to speak more about the COVID-19 response laid out in Monday’s annual budget proposal. The governor visited a COVID-19 testing site in south Los Angeles highlighting the Emergency Response Package.| RELATED | ‘More work to be done’: Gov. Newsom proposes $1.4 billion in emergency funding to bolster COVID-19 effortsWithin the proposal, Newsom would spend $2.7 billion on efforts related to vaccines, boosters, COVID-19 testing and “increased medical personnel.”The goal is to “do more in testing,” Newsom said during his budget proposal Monday. The effort would also give more financial support for hospitals and front-line workers and partnerships, and to combat misinformation and address disparities he said.| MORE | Here’s what’s in Gov. Newsom’s 2022 budget blueprint It’s all part of a plan revealed Monday for how to spend more than $200 billion of taxpayer money. It’s the first version of his annual budget proposal to the Democratic-controlled Legislature and details of what ultimately gets passed will change as he negotiates with leaders of his party and circumstances change.He said that he anticipated that a revision of the budget will “look very different” in May.

Gov. Gavin Newsom was in Los Angeles County on Wednesday to speak more about the COVID-19 response laid out in Monday’s annual budget proposal.

The governor visited a COVID-19 testing site in south Los Angeles highlighting the Emergency Response Package.

| RELATED | ‘More work to be done’: Gov. Newsom proposes $1.4 billion in emergency funding to bolster COVID-19 efforts

Within the proposal, Newsom would spend $2.7 billion on efforts related to vaccines, boosters, COVID-19 testing and “increased medical personnel.”

The goal is to “do more in testing,” Newsom said during his budget proposal Monday. The effort would also give more financial support for hospitals and front-line workers and partnerships, and to combat misinformation and address disparities he said.

| MORE | Here’s what’s in Gov. Newsom’s 2022 budget blueprint

It’s all part of a plan revealed Monday for how to spend more than $200 billion of taxpayer money. It’s the first version of his annual budget proposal to the Democratic-controlled Legislature and details of what ultimately gets passed will change as he negotiates with leaders of his party and circumstances change.

He said that he anticipated that a revision of the budget will “look very different” in May.

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