Sen. Rhonda Fields surprised by release of convict in son’s murder

AURORA, Colo. (KDVR) — A restraining order was granted Tuesday for Colorado state Sen. Rhonda Fields against a man convicted in the murder of her son.

Seventeen years ago, Javad Marshall-Fields and his fiancée, Vivian Wolfe, were gunned down while driving on Dayton Street in Aurora on June 20, 2005.

Percy Carter was arrested on charges of intimidating a witness. Police say he threatened them the night before they were murdered for Marshall-Fields being a witness to an upcoming murder trial.

Parish Carter and his father, Percy Carter, were some of the individuals tried, convicted and found guilty in relation to Marshall-Fields’ and Wolfe’s murders. In addition, Robert Ray and Sir Mario Owens are currently serving life without the option of parole.

Percy Carter was convicted as an accessory for harboring his son and getting rid of the weapon. He was recently released from jail, much to the surprise of Sen. Fields.

“I had no time to plan. I found myself scrambling in reference to — how do I tell my daughter? And how did this happen to me?” Fields said.

Seventeen years ago, Javad Marshall-Fields and his fiancée, Vivian Wolfe, were gunned down while driving on Dayton Street in Aurora on June 20, 2005. (Credit: Maisha Fields)

Fields family frustrated by lack of notice, involvement

The notification came after the fact, although state law requires victims to be notified before.

“He could be sitting out in front our homes, he could be watching us right now,” said Maisha Fields, Javad’s sister. “He very well knows where we live, but we don’t know what he looks like, how tall he is, where he was paroled to. And it’s been over a year and so that’s a violation to the victim’s bill of rights, and it’s a violation to my brother and the justice that was rendered for him. And it’s just downright wrong.”

To the relief of Sen. Fields and her family, the restraining order was granted on Tuesday. But she is still frustrated by the fact that they weren’t notified of his release, parole hearing or even given an opportunity to give a victim’s impact statement.

Maisha Fields said it was traumatizing coming back to court.

“This building represents trauma; it represents a time when I had to say goodbye to my brother. And to come back here after we had a victory in sending four people to jail for their murder, we’re now back because the criminal justice system has failed victims.”

Sen. Fields said she’s determined to get to the bottom of what went wrong so history doesn’t repeat itself.

“I’m really perplexed. I’m still trying to understand the victim whole notification process because I want to make sure there’s no gaps,” Sen. Fields said.

“So, we need to tighten up whatever caused what happened to me to make sure it doesn’t happen to another victim in our state,” she said.

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